Making ourselves look good

Discussion of the art and craft of improvisation.

Moderators: happywaffle, arclight, bradisntclever

Making ourselves look good

Postby TeresaYork » June 6th, 2012, 9:18 am

Do you think you have to take yourself first in improv before you can take care of others?

Or do I need to forget myself and by focusing solely on the other person, all will fall into place?

How do I let someone know they are taking too good of care of themselves? :)
User avatar
TeresaYork
 
Posts: 233
Joined: August 13th, 2007, 11:15 pm
Location: San Diego

Postby Rev. Jordan T. Maxwell » June 6th, 2012, 10:00 am

i think just like in life, you have to take care of yourself before you can be of any use to others. but it's all about balance, and you can do both at the same time. i think if the other person is ONLY taking care of themselves, then it might be time for a confab. but don't come at them with accusations. frame it in terms of what YOU need. "Hey, I feel like I could use some more support in my scenes. Can you help me out?" "I'm having trouble getting things established at the beginning of a scene. You want to work with me on that when we're onstage together?" then they don't feel like a dick, they feel like a hero coming to the rescue. :wink:
Sweetness Prevails.

-the Reverend
User avatar
Rev. Jordan T. Maxwell
 
Posts: 4215
Joined: March 17th, 2006, 6:50 pm
Location: Austin, TX

Postby ClintHarris » June 6th, 2012, 3:43 pm

Matthew 7:5

I'm pretty sure Jesus was talking about improv.
"[T]he exploration of comedy takes one up to, and into, some of the deepest mysteries in existence." --Paul Johnson
User avatar
ClintHarris
 
Posts: 16
Joined: March 5th, 2012, 12:31 am
Location: Austin, TX

Postby Rev. Jordan T. Maxwell » June 6th, 2012, 3:46 pm

i hear his set in Bethany killed...

...wait, no, i meant the other thing. 8)
Sweetness Prevails.

-the Reverend
User avatar
Rev. Jordan T. Maxwell
 
Posts: 4215
Joined: March 17th, 2006, 6:50 pm
Location: Austin, TX

Re: Making ourselves look good

Postby ratliff » June 6th, 2012, 5:36 pm

TeresaYork wrote:How do I let someone know they are taking too good of care of themselves? :)


You don't. That's what a coach is for.
"I'm not a real aspirational cat."
-- TJ Jagodowski
User avatar
ratliff
 
Posts: 1602
Joined: June 16th, 2006, 2:44 am
Location: austin

Postby KathyRose » June 6th, 2012, 8:58 pm

What say, you just play whoever your character is and let whatever happens, happen.
What is to give light must endure burning. - Viktor Frankl
User avatar
KathyRose
 
Posts: 803
Joined: February 22nd, 2008, 5:12 pm
Location: Austin, TX

Postby jillybee72 » June 7th, 2012, 12:46 am

Taking care of yourself is the best way to take care of others. No one likes going out into a scene and turning to look at their scene partner who's standing there blankly like they have nothing. Give yourself something.

Sounds like someone you know is maybe is misinterpreting the advice "take care of yourself" to mean "make yourself the star." That is not the case at all. It just means give yourself something to go in with so you can make powerful moves that will make it fun for your partner and for you.
User avatar
jillybee72
 
Posts: 649
Joined: November 16th, 2009, 2:20 pm

Postby jillybee72 » June 7th, 2012, 12:48 am

In a little side note, I find it really helpful to not judge my scene partners. I just to play with everyone as if they are the best possible person I could be on stage with in this moment and as if their choices are golden.
User avatar
jillybee72
 
Posts: 649
Joined: November 16th, 2009, 2:20 pm

Postby TeresaYork » June 7th, 2012, 6:50 am

Thanks Jill.

I always say, "let's just have fun," but sometimes feel betrayed if I feel like my scene partner doesn't have that same agenda. I need to get over that!
User avatar
TeresaYork
 
Posts: 233
Joined: August 13th, 2007, 11:15 pm
Location: San Diego

Postby Brad Hawkins » June 7th, 2012, 7:19 am

jillybee72 wrote:In a little side note, I find it really helpful to not judge my scene partners. I just to play with everyone as if they are the best possible person I could be on stage with in this moment and as if their choices are golden.


That sounds great, but how do you do that? Any tricks?
The silver knives are flashing in the tired old cafe. A ghost climbs on the table in a bridal negligee. She says "My body is the life; my body is the way." I raise my arm against it all and I catch the bride's bouquet.
User avatar
Brad Hawkins
 
Posts: 1168
Joined: August 2nd, 2010, 10:43 am
Location: Austin, TX

Postby Asaf » June 7th, 2012, 8:51 am

I'm very much of the Annoyance mind on this that the best gift you can give your scene partner is a strong sense of self.

We use the diagram from those airline safety brochures as an example. You know, the picture where the adult is putting on their oxygen mask before helping their child with theirs.

You're of no help to them if you haven't checked in with yourself.
User avatar
Asaf
 
Posts: 2770
Joined: October 23rd, 2006, 4:45 pm
Location: somewhere without a car

Postby ratliff » June 7th, 2012, 11:10 am

Teresa, that's one of my biggest problems. To me a huge part of it is trusting the other person's motivations. If you know that they're trying to play the best scene possible -- as opposed to celebrating themselves -- it's easier to embrace what they're doing fully, as Asaf suggests. That's why playing with a group for a long time is more fulfilling to me than just jumping onstage with whoever, because in the latter case, even though I need to accept what they're bringing, I may not know them well enough to fully trust them. Seeing people play in a way that seems selfish to me inevitably brings out my most selfish instincts, but I'm working toward being the kind of improviser I want to be all the time, regardless of who I'm playing with. To me what marks truly great improvisers is their ability to make their partners look brilliant by committing completely to whatever gets thrown at them. The two examples who come immediately to mind are TJ Jagodowski and Jill Bernard.

"The only mistake you can make in improv is casting."
-- Dave Razowsky
"I'm not a real aspirational cat."
-- TJ Jagodowski
User avatar
ratliff
 
Posts: 1602
Joined: June 16th, 2006, 2:44 am
Location: austin

Postby TeresaYork » June 7th, 2012, 12:02 pm

Thanks Ratliff! I want to be a better imp, but more than that, a better person. As cliche as I think of it, all you need is love. :)
User avatar
TeresaYork
 
Posts: 233
Joined: August 13th, 2007, 11:15 pm
Location: San Diego

Postby ratliff » June 7th, 2012, 12:12 pm

TeresaYork wrote:Thanks Ratliff! I want to be a better imp, but more than that, a better person. As cliche as I think of it, all you need is love. :)


WHY ARE YOU LEAVING US?

Sorry, I told myself I wasn't going to do that.
"I'm not a real aspirational cat."
-- TJ Jagodowski
User avatar
ratliff
 
Posts: 1602
Joined: June 16th, 2006, 2:44 am
Location: austin

Postby Brad Hawkins » June 7th, 2012, 12:58 pm

ratliff wrote:Teresa, that's one of my biggest problems. To me a huge part of it is trusting the other person's motivations. If you know that they're trying to play the best scene possible -- as opposed to celebrating themselves -- it's easier to embrace what they're doing fully, as Asaf suggests.


Very well put, and puts a lot into perspective. Perhaps being trustworthy (in the sense of which you speak) should be my goal now.
The silver knives are flashing in the tired old cafe. A ghost climbs on the table in a bridal negligee. She says "My body is the life; my body is the way." I raise my arm against it all and I catch the bride's bouquet.
User avatar
Brad Hawkins
 
Posts: 1168
Joined: August 2nd, 2010, 10:43 am
Location: Austin, TX

Next

Return to Improv Theory & Practice

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron